Wednesday, 6 Jul 2022

Vaccines help to prevent COVID-related emergency department, urgent care visits for children and adolescents

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Using data from 10 states, a study from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) is one of the first real-world studies to show that two doses of an mRNA vaccine provide protection against COVID-19 associated emergency department and urgent care visits among children ages 5 to 11.

The study also found that two doses of an mRNA vaccine provide protection against COVID-19 associated emergency department and urgent care visits as well as very high protection against hospitalization among adolescents aged 12 to 17.

“A positive pattern, similar to what we have reported in adults, is emerging,” said study co-author Shaun Grannis, M.D., M.S., vice president for data and analytics at Regenstrief Institute and professor of family medicine at Indiana University School of Medicine. “Prevention of emergency department and urgent care visits shows that the vaccines are thwarting moderate COVID-19 in both children and adolescents; prevention of hospitalizations in 12- to-17-year-olds indicates vaccine effectiveness against more serious disease in this age group, which we hope to also see in 5-to-11-year-olds when there is sufficient data.”

“We now have compelling evidence that vaccines, and for 16- and 17-year-olds, boosters, provide important protection for both children and adolescents—data-driven information that parents should take into consideration when making decisions for their family,” said Dr. Grannis.

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