Saturday, 3 Dec 2022

Mystery of female squirting solved

Mystery of female squirting solved: Stream of clear liquid expelled by some women during an orgasm ‘is just watered-down urine’

  • Liquid that spurts out during an orgasm originates in the bladder, tests showed
  • Yet, the fluid expelled is not completely urine — it can contain female ejaculate
  • The bizarre study, performed in Japan, saw five women climax in a laboratory 

It’s a female sexual phenomenon which has baffled experts for hundreds, if not thousands of years. 

Yet scientists may have finally answered one of the biggest questions surrounding ‘squirting’.

The liquid that spurts out during an orgasm originates in the bladder, meaning it is mostly urine.

Yet, the fluid expelled is not completely urine — it can contain female ejaculate, an experiment found. 

The bizarre study, performed in Japan, saw five women climax in a laboratory, either through sex with their partner or masturbation.

It’s a sexual phenomenon which has baffled experts for hundreds, if not thousands of years. Yet scientists may have finally answered one of the biggest questions surrounding ‘squirting’

All of the volunteers, who were in their 30s, 40s or 50s, were able to squirt.  

They had a water-based solution coloured blue injected into their bladder, allowing researchers to track the liquid during their orgasm.

Just before the squirting ‘commenced’, the Miyabi Urogyne Clinic team entered the room to catch the emissions in a cup. They admitted it was ‘difficult’.

‘All squirted fluids were blue’, Dr Miyabi Inoue and colleagues said. 

Dr Jessica Påfs, a sexologist based at the University of Gothenburg in Sweden, said: ‘This confirms that squirting does seem to originate from the bladder.’

But she told NewScientist that there was ‘still so many questions’ to be answered.

She added: ‘Does the liquid have the same composition as urine? And why is it that some women expel this liquid and others don’t?’

Four women involved in the study also experienced ‘female ejaculation’, a sensation different to the process of squirting itself.

Squirting refers to the involuntary expulsion of a fluid ‘as clear as water’, and enough to make some women feel like they’ve wet themselves. 

What IS squirting? And how is it different to female ejaculation?

Squirting refers to the involuntary expulsion of a fluid ‘as clear as water’, and enough to make some women feel like they’ve wet themselves. 

In contrast, female ejaculate is a thicker, milky substance which is secreted in much lower quantities.

Ejaculate can be found in the squirt of women, tests have shown. 

Both are different to the lubricating fluid released during arousal, which the vagina oozes naturally in anticipation of sexual intercourse.

In contrast, female ejaculate is a thicker, milky substance which is secreted in much lower quantities.

Both are different to the lubricating fluid released during arousal, which the vagina oozes naturally in anticipation of sexual intercourse.

Female ejaculate contained prostate-specific antigen (PSA), a protein produced by the walnut-sized male organ responsible for turning semen into liquid. 

Although women don’t have an actual prostate, they do have tissue nicknamed the ‘female prostate’. The Skene’s gland, located near the urethra, is thought to release the substance.

It is, for this reason, the researchers couldn’t explicitly state that squirt fluid was 100 per cent urine.

Instead, the findings suggests the ejaculate is produced at the same time as urine is squirted out — with both mixing together in the urethra. 

The results, published in the International Journal of Urology, confirm the prevailing theory that squirt is mainly watered down urine.

For decades, the theory that squirt is just urine has proved controversial. Some women insist it does not taste or smell remotely similar.

The liquid is typically clear, unlike the yellowish tinge of urine. It is also said to have a sweet taste.

Yet there was no other organ, that scientists knew of, that was able to hold as much liquid as the bladder, meaning it was always the likely culprit.

One theory as to why squirting occurs is that the urethral muscles relax as a woman orgasms, making it difficult for her to hold in urine. 

The team behind the new study insisted, however, that it does not mean it is urinary incontinence.

None of the women in the new study had any history of incontinence. 

For now, the exact science behind squirting, first described 2,000 years ago by the likes of Aristotle, remains a mystery.

One of the biggest studies into the topic, published in 2014, effectively concluded that squirt was ‘essentially the involuntary emission of urine during sexual activity’.

In order to test the theory, seven women, who claimed they regularly emitted liquid during sex, were asked to urinate. Pelvic ultrasound scans were carried out to check their bladders were empty before being asked to squirt in the name of science.

To check if their bladders remained empty, they were scanned once again moments before reaching climax. It revealed their organs had refilled.

The women underwent one final scan, moments after they climaxed.  

It showed their bladders had ’emptied again’ moments after they squirted, according to results unveiled in the Journal of Sexual Medicine. 

Although concluding it was mainly urine, the team, from Hopital Privé de Parly 2, on the outskirts of Paris, accepted that there was often a ‘marginal’ amount of ‘prostatic secretions’.

British porn was even temporarily banned from showing female ejaculation because of the urine issue made it ‘obscene’ under UK regulations.

Only a fraction of women are able to squirt, with estimates suggesting as few as 5 per cent possess the ability. 

Videos online promise to teach women how to learn the technique, offering step-by-step tutorials. 

Source: Read Full Article