Monday, 3 Oct 2022

Joan Collins’ fears over ‘terrifying illness’ – ‘You don’t want to live like that’

Joan Collins describes being called in to replace Elizabeth Taylor

We use your sign-up to provide content in ways you’ve consented to and to improve our understanding of you. This may include adverts from us and 3rd parties based on our understanding. You can unsubscribe at any time. More info

Famed for playing Alexis Carrington in 1980s soap opera Dynasty, in addition to Princess Nellifer in the Land of the Pharaohs (1955), and Pearl in The Flintstones in Viva Rock Vegas (2000), Dame Joan Collins has been starring on TV for decades. In a candid interview, the actress said: “Touch wood, I’ve never had any health problems other than a bit of toothache… But my husband Percy’s mother had Alzheimer’s – and that’s a terrifying illness.”

Percy Gibson – a Hollywood producer, whom she married in 2002 – is Collins’ fifth husband. In previous years, she married: Irish actor Maxwell Reed (1952); filmmaker Anthony Newley (1963); American businessman Ron Kass (1972); and pop star Peter Holm (1985). Gibson, 32 years her junior, would have to say goodbye to his mother, Bridget, much sooner than he would have liked as Alzheimer’s takes away a person’s personality over time. To the Daily Record, Collins continued: “You don’t want to live like that [with dementia]. It is far better to drift off slowly.”

READ MORE: GMB host Ranvir Singh’s agonising ‘allergic reaction’ that happened on live TV explained

Alzheimer’s disease is the most common form of dementia, the Alzheimer’s Society pointed out.

The disease occurs when abnormal proteins, called plaque and tangles, build up in the brain, thereby interfering with brain cells communicating with one another.

“Eventually nerve cells die and brain tissue is lost,” the charity pointed out.

Symptoms of the disease are mild to start with, but as more of the brain becomes damaged, the signs of dementia become more pronounced.

“For most people, the first signs of Alzheimer’s are problems with their memory,” the Alzheimer’s Society pointed out.

Alzheimer’s disease is the most common form of dementia, the Alzheimer’s Society pointed out. The disease occurs when abnormal proteins, called plaque and tangles, build up in the brain, thereby interfering with brain cells communicating with one another. “Eventually nerve cells die and brain tissue is lost,” the charity pointed out. Symptoms of the disease are mild to start with, but as more of the brain becomes damaged, the signs of dementia become more pronounced. “For most people, the first signs of Alzheimer’s are problems with their memory,” the Alzheimer’s Society pointed out.

To differentiate from everyday forgetfulness, Alzheimer’s specifically makes learning new information difficult and the ability to recall recent events extremely tough. “This is because early on in Alzheimer’s the damage is usually to a part of the brain called the hippocampus,” the charity explained. “However, the person’s memory for events that happened a long time ago is not usually affected in the early stages.” Additional memory issues may show up as:

  • Losing items, such as keys and glasses, around the house
  • Forgetting a friend’s name
  • Struggling to find the right world in a conversation
  • Forgetting about recent conversations
  • Getting lost in a familiar place or familiar journey
  • Forget appointments or significant dates.

Alzheimer’s eventually leads to issues with thinking, reasoning and language skills. For example, visuospatial skills can be negatively affected, meaning going up and down stairs becomes arduous as the ability to judge distances is diminished. Mood changes are also fairly common, which can make a person feel anxious, depressed, or more easily annoyed.

Over time, a person who has Alzheimer’s will need assistance with living their day-to-day life. Help will be needed for tasks such as cooking, cleaning, washing, and grocery shopping. Watching someone you love suffer from Alzheimer’s can be heartbreaking; something that Collins can relate to. Supporting a partner whose parent has Alzheimer’s disease can be challenging. You can seek support from the Alzheimer’s Society charity.

Source: Read Full Article